Aboriginals · Freedom of speech

18C is not protecting anybody

Liberty Works, by Jacinta Price, March 25, 2017: Mname is Jacinta Nampijinpa Price, I am an Alice Springs Town Councillor and campaigner against family violence. Recently I addressed the National Press Club along with Marcia Langton and Josephine Cashman about the silencing of Aboriginal women victims of violence and the realities of life in remote… Continue reading 18C is not protecting anybody

Aboriginals

Bill Shorten calls for Commonwealth to compensate Stolen Generations

Earlier today, Bill Shorten suggested the Commonwealth provide compensation for victims of the Stolen Generation. Now, as I’ve detailed before, the idea of the Stolen Generations: that white Australians historically ‘stole’ half- caste children away from Indigenous mothers to diminish the Aboriginal race, is totally fictitious. But even if this did occur, and that we can… Continue reading Bill Shorten calls for Commonwealth to compensate Stolen Generations

Aboriginals · Australia Day Wars

Why we shouldn’t change Australia Day

“What’s so bad about January 26?”, The Spectator, 26 January, 2017: This week, Warren Mundine proposed that Australia Day should be moved from January 26 to January 1, because the 26th marks the arrival of the first white settlers at Sydney Cove. He does not have a problem with the concept of Australia Day, but… Continue reading Why we shouldn’t change Australia Day

Aboriginals · Australia Day Wars

Reconciliation or Revenge?

Ahead of Australia Day in 2017, Sherry Sufi has released yet another excellent piece for us on Indigenous affairs. “Reconciliation or Revenge?”, The Spectator, January 21, 2017: For a decade, a national apology was sought from Prime Minister John Howard. For a decade, he refused to provide one on the basis that most Australians were… Continue reading Reconciliation or Revenge?

Aboriginals

The myth of Aboriginal Exceptionalism

“The myth of Aboriginal Exceptionalism”, xyz.com, November 26, 2016: Unless perhaps you live in the Mesolithic Period in an outback Aboriginal community, you will no doubt have heard of the City of Fremantle’s recent decision to move Australia Day and rename it to One Day to make it a ‘culturally-inclusive alternative’.  Unless you’re insane, you… Continue reading The myth of Aboriginal Exceptionalism

Aboriginals

Why There Were No Stolen Generations (Part Two)

A fascinating sequel to the original piece I posted late last week. As this work so vehemently contradicts the current consensus on Australia’s history, it makes for an interesting yet detailed read. “Why There Were No Stolen Generations (Part Two)”, Quadrant, January 1, 2010: The empirical underpinnings of Bringing Them Home derived largely from the work of white academic… Continue reading Why There Were No Stolen Generations (Part Two)

Aboriginals

Why There Were No Stolen Generations (Part One)

An interesting, highly detailed article disavowing the idea of an Aboriginal ‘Stolen Generation’. Even those who disagree with its thesis ought to read it. “Why There Were No Stolen Generations (Part One”, Quadrant, January 1, 2010: Most Australians would be taken aback to find that whenever academics in the field of genocide studies discuss history’s worst… Continue reading Why There Were No Stolen Generations (Part One)

Aboriginals

The problem with #DefineAboriginal

When in conversation with conservative journalist Andrew Bolt, One Nation senator Pauline Hanson questioned the way Australia defined Aboriginals. “What defines an Aboriginal?” Senator Hanson asked Andrew Bolt. “If you marry an Aboriginal, you can be classified as an Aboriginal. “Or if the community or the elders accept you into that community, you can be defined… Continue reading The problem with #DefineAboriginal

Aboriginals

Warren Mundine on the latest Indigenous inquiry

So often, we’re told that as ‘white people’, that we should listen to Aboriginal people more often, to pursue appropriate policies towards their communities. Well now there is an Indigenous person speaking on Indigenous matters, Warren Mundine, and we could do far, far worse than to listen to him. Rational, intelligent Australians, realize that governments who… Continue reading Warren Mundine on the latest Indigenous inquiry

Aboriginals · Freedom of speech

Freedom of speech under siege

As the Andrew Bolt and QUT case had shown previously, section 18C of the Racial Discrimination Act is the great Trojan horse of modern Australia, as it subtly yet meaningfully moves to chip away at our great democratic tradition. The legislation’s most recent victim in Bill Leak, demonstrates the trivial, squabbling mess that we Australians have become: a people… Continue reading Freedom of speech under siege

Aboriginals

Black Lives Matter down under?

What are we to make of the recent Kalgoorlie riots, and what they suggest about contemporary race relations? That the same anarchic, toxic and divisive rhetoric frequently espoused by the Black Lives Matter group in the United States, has found a home in Australia. Just as the past few years have shown us coverage from America, which have… Continue reading Black Lives Matter down under?

Aboriginals

National Sorry day

Today was National Sorry day, another symbolic, token, and yet meaningless gesture, which aimed at remembering and commemorating the mistreatment of Australia’s Indigenous population. Regrettably, it is yet another gesture from Australia, that purports our country is forever indebted to its Indigenous population, for its actual and alleged crimes of the past. If this day brings particular joy, or… Continue reading National Sorry day

Aboriginals

The Welfare card

Last month, the Federal Government’s bill on Welfare cards passed through the Senate, authorizing the use of these cards in trials throughout areas of remote Indigenous Australia. In basic terms, the idea is for entitlement money to be provided to a person exclusively through this card, as opposed to traditional welfare payment systems. 80 % of this card cannot be… Continue reading The Welfare card

Aboriginals

Different Perspective on Indigenous Australia

I recall a conversation I had with a friend several months ago, regarding Indigenous issues. Having both grown up in small towns with a significant Aboriginal component, we were discussing responses to the various Indigenous issues, and he raised a point that I believe to be neglected. To paraphrase, my friend stated something along the… Continue reading Different Perspective on Indigenous Australia